• Best Defensive Third Basemen

    Best Defensive Third Basemen

    It is important to remember that there are fewer third basemen in the Hall of Fame than any other position. The position has traditionally been looked at as a corner power-hitting place in the lineup. Therefore, trying to find a good power hitter who can also play defense is a challenging proposition. Most winning teams […]

  • Christy Mathewson - The Christian Gentleman

    Christy Mathewson: The Christian Gentleman

    Once, in the ninth inning of a game against the Cubs, the great Christy Mathewson looked into his fine-fielding catcher, the Californian Chief Meyers, for the sign. Suddenly, Meyers called “Time!”, jumped up and headed to the mound. “What’s the matter?”, asked Mathewson. “Skip wants a double-play ball,” responded Meyers. Mathewson glanced toward the dugout […]

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    Rube Waddell: The First American League Ace

    In the early part of the 20th century, baseball fans came out in droves to watch “Rube strike ’em out!” Yes, Rube Waddell was the new American League’s star pitcher. He was a flame-throwing strikeout ace–and he was really something to see. Before some games, he would paint, on the sidewalks and streets, “Come watch […]

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    Roger Connor: The First Giant

    Roger Connor was the best first baseman in baseball during his 18 year career. He set a record for career home runs that was not broken until Babe Ruth broke it in 1921, 24 years later. What made Connor a star was his combination of power and superb fielding–an amazing balance on both sides of […]

  • Bill-Lange

    Bill Lange: How Good Was He?

    When asked about center fielder Bill Lange, A. H. Spink, founder of The Sporting News, responded, “Lange was Ty Cobb enlarged, fully great in speed, batting skill and baserunning.” Others agreed, only giving the nod to Buck Ewing as the greatest 19th century player because of his expertise at catcher. While Lange was widely acknowledged […]

  • Davy Force

    David “Davy” Force: The Gold Glove

    David “Davy” Force was not baseball’s first great short stop. Players such as Dickey Pearce and George Wright helped to develop the position in the 1860s and early 1870s. Yet, Force is clearly remembered as the first great defensive player at the position. He played on a number of teams for 19 years in the […]

  • UBTG Dream Team Baseball Poll

    UBTG DREAM TEAM BASEBALL POLL

    Recently, Ultimate Baseball The Game (UBTG) launched a “dream team” project, a Dream Team Baseball Poll designed to tally respondents’ favorite picks of all time at each position. I was asked to submit my all-time dream picks, and I decided to publish the following post in hopes of spurring some lively discussion. As many of […]

  • Monte Ward

    Monte Ward: Leader, Scholar and Athlete

    John Montgomery “Monte” Ward, all 5′ 9″ and 165 pounds of him, was one of the top pitchers of his generation. He was also one of the top shortstops of the 1880s and 1890s. And, he was one of the most influential “movers and shakers” in the history of baseball. As legends of baseball go, […]

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    Amos Rusie: The Pitcher Who Changed the Game

    Amos Rusie threw so hard, many fans swore they couldn’t see the ball when it left his hand. Experts believe he could “bring it” at 100mph–and that he routinely threw in the high 90s. His catcher, Dick Buckley, under his glove, placed a thin strip of lead covered in a handkerchief, and added a sponge […]

  • Big Sam Thompson Main

    Big Sam Thompson: The First Great Clutch Hitter

    In the 1880s, a new baseball star appeared on the horizon. He was 6′ 2 1/2″ tall and around 225 pounds, a pretty big fellow for his era, and his teammates, and the fans, called him “Big Sam”. Samuel Luther “Big Sam” Thompson was indeed a formidable force with a bat in his hands. He […]

Japanese & American Baseball Legends

From Deep Right Field covers Japanese & American baseball legends, famous baseball players & important baseball facts about the history of the game. As always, comments on legends of baseball are welcome. I am a baseball historian. I have always been fascinated by the influence that baseball has had on our culture & the influence people have had on the game. As my grandfather once said, "When America is excavated 2,000 years from now, the US will be mostly known for its form of government, our popular music... & baseball." It is the only sport through which you can study the evolution of American culture throughout our history.

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Greatest Players of All-Time Series–Position Players: Base Stealing/Base Running

Here is a list of the top base stealers/base runners of all-time. We have used a formula that compares, era to era, a composite of base stealing and base running. The list has been pared down to the top 24 pictured below (click on the thumbnail to enlarge each picture). Hope you enjoy!   Players […]

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The Greatest Players: Total Defense #1 through #16 (excluding catchers)

This post ranks the 30 greatest players in the history of baseball based on their defensive performance (this list is for position players excluding catchers). Our defensive ratings include not only the ability to field and throw the ball, but also the players’ knowledge of the game, when and where to throw, positioning, the capability […]

Wally Yonamine

History of Baseball: The Man From Maui

A previous post about the great pitcher, Tadashi “Bozo” Wakabayashi, prompted an ongoing conversation about who is the greatest Hawaiian athlete of all time. There are many candidates… Buster Crabbe, Gerry Lopez, the legendary Duke Kahanamoku… and several other worthy athletes. For my money, the greatest athlete in the history of Hawaii is… the man […]

Christopher "Big Six" Mathewson was part of the famous "First Five" inductees voted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1936. The others were Walter Johnson, Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb and Honus Wagner. Keith Olbermann is an American journalist and baseball fanatic / historian.

The Greatest Cooperstown Find: Olbermann on Mathewson

I was checking a source this week on a baseball story and came across Keith Olbermann’s August 5th, 2009, MLBlogs Network story on “The Greatest Cooperstown Find,” part of his Baseball Nerd presentations on MLB.com. Keith Olbermann is now with Current TV, and is one of America’s most brilliant and provocative journalists. He is also […]

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The Greatest Players: Total Offense #1 through #45

This post ranks the 45 greatest players in the history of baseball based on their offensive performance. Forty of the players are described in previous posts covering Total Player Ratings; here, here, here and here. Five players not mentioned in those posts are described in further detail below.   #44 (two players are tied) Roger […]

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The History of How We Follow Baseball

I stumbled across Philip Bump’s October 26th, 2011, article on “The History of How We Follow Baseball.” Absolutely fascinating! Philip Bump is a developer, strategist and writer from Washington, D. C. His article appeared in The Atlantic, and is an excellent read. It brought back memories of going to the local barbershop in Tennoji (south […]

Honus Wagner

History of Baseball: Greatest Players of All-Time Series (1 to 14)

The following post is part of an ongoing series taken from Paul Gillespie’s book, ALL-TIME GREATS OF BASEBALL: My Top Picks At Each Position. These lists include the greatest offensive and defensive players in the history of baseball, extracted from a database Paul developed for the lifetime composite ratings and skill sets of players from […]

Joseph Jefferson Jackson (1887–1951)

History of Baseball: Greatest Players of All-Time Series (15 to 27)

The following post is part of an ongoing series taken from Paul Gillespie’s book, ALL-TIME GREATS OF BASEBALL: My Top Picks At Each Position. These lists include the greatest offensive and defensive players in the history of baseball, extracted from a database Paul developed for the lifetime composite ratings and skill sets of players from […]

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History of Baseball: Greatest Players of All-Time Series (28 to 39)

The following post is part of an ongoing series taken from Paul Gillespie’s book, ALL-TIME GREATS OF BASEBALL: My Top Picks At Each Position. These lists include the greatest offensive and defensive players in the history of baseball, extracted from a database Paul developed for the lifetime composite ratings and skill sets of players from […]

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History of Baseball: Greatest Players of All-Time Series (40-53)

The following post is part of an ongoing series taken from Paul Gillespie’s book, ALL-TIME GREATS OF BASEBALL: My Top Picks At Each Position. These lists include the greatest offensive and defensive players in the history of baseball, extracted from a database Paul developed for the lifetime composite ratings and skill sets of players from […]

Cy Williams (1887-1974) was one of only three players born before 1900 to hit 200 homers in his career (Babe Ruth and Rogers Hornsby are the other two).

History of Baseball: The Greatest Players of All-time Series

The philosopher Jacques Barzun had it right. He pointed out the necessity of learning baseball if one was to understand the essence of American culture. My grandfather once said that when America is excavated by archaeologists two thousand years in the future, it will be known for three main contributions to civilization… our form of […]

Best known for his 56-game hitting streak (May 15–July 16, 1941) and his career with the New York Yankees, DiMaggio (left) was a three-time MVP winner and 13-time All-Star (the only player to be selected for the All-Star Game in every season he played). Gould (1941–2002) was an American paleontologist, evolutionary biologist, and historian of science. He was also one of the most influential and widely read writers of popular science of his generation.

Stephen J. Gould: The Singularity of DiMaggio’s Streak

Joe DiMaggio’s 56-game hitting streak is arguably the single most unattainable record in all of sports. I recall reading a treatise on the subject by another American icon, Stephen J. Gould (1941-2002), a few years ago. Gould was a well-known professor at Harvard University, an internationally recognized evolutionary theorist. He published dozens of books and […]