The Story of Matt Bush: A Cautionary Tale

Matt Bush

A friend of mine forwarded this excellent article on Matt Bush, written by Jeff Passan, national columnist for Yahoo Sports. Passan originally published this item on March 26th, 2012. My friend and I had been recalling a similar (in some respects) situation that befell a former high school classmate–a multi-talented baseball player–from years ago. I […]

Tris Speaker: The Grey Eagle

Tris Speaker

Tris Speaker is on most lists as one of the top 5 center fielders of all time. On many rankings, he is the top defensive center fielder, and he is generally evaluated as one of the top 6 position players ever. How did this sometime champion calf-roper achieve such a lofty status in baseball lore? […]

Greatest Third Basemen Of All Time

Greatest Third Basemen Cover

The following is a Three Part presentation on the Greatest Third Basemen of All Time (be sure to scroll down for photos). Part One will list the top-rated players in reverse order by Total Player Rating; Part Two will highlight the offense, and Part Three will cover the best defensive players. “A guy who strikes […]

Shoeless Joe Jackson: The Natural

Shoeless Joe Jackson Featured

If there was ever The Perfect Swing it was created by Shoeless Joe. It was described as “elegant” and “balletic”–a “natural” swing. And, it produced some of the most amazing numbers in the game. In 1910, Shoeless Joe Jackson was traded to the American League’s Cleveland franchise. It was the beginning of an astounding eleven […]

Addie Joss: Standard of Excellence

Joss' career record of a 0.97 WHIP (walks plus hits per innings pitched) is the best in baseball history.

Addie Joss starred for the American League’s Cleveland franchise in the earlier part of the 20th century (1902-1910). Cleveland’s team name eventually became the Indians, and featured great players such as second baseman Nap Lajoie, left fielder “Shoeless Joe” Jackson and center fielder Tris Speaker. At about the dawn of the 1900s, a young man […]

Michael Lewis: Coach Fitz’s Management Theory

Coach Billy Fitzgerald (left), one of five inductees into the Greater New Orleans Sports Hall of Fame of 2007 and Michael Lewis, a best-selling American non-fiction author and financial journalist. His books include The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine, Liar's Poker, The New New Thing and Moneyball among others.

Recently, some of us former baseball coaches (and current coaches) were cutting up reminiscences about a small handful of parents we have encountered over the years. We also reflected on some of our former coaches and Michael Lewis’ brilliant piece on his high school baseball coach was recalled. The truth is that most parents and coaches are fine […]

Eiji Sawamura: The First Great Japanese Pitcher

1935_dai_nippon-620

I first heard the legend of Eiji Sawamura when I was in elementary school. My Japanese friends in our neighborhood, and their fathers and grandfathers, told me about how he had struck out Ruth, Gehrig, Gehringer and Foxx… in order. My father confirmed the story, and filled in the missing parts of the legend. It seemed hard […]

Yu Darvish: Dollars and Doubts

In 201, Yu Darvish became 1st NPB pitcher (since the start of the 2 league system) to pitch 5 straight seasons with an ERA under 2.

Everyone is now aware that the AL’s Texas Rangers won the bidding to negotiate with Yu Darvish for a mega-bucks contract. Yes, it appears that, barring a surprise, the Nippon Ham Fighters’ star pitcher will join the Rangers rotation for the foreseeable future. Total cost to the Rangers? In the neighborhood of $125 million. Of […]

Sports Medicine Said to Overuse M.R.I.’s

In the fall, Gina Kolata took a critical look at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and its suspected overuse in professional sports. She published the latest findings in the New York Times on October 28th, 2011. I have been privileged to discuss the value of MRI’s with baseball people such as Eddie Robinson, Jon Matlack and […]

A Major-League Divorce

Left:Frank McCourt in the stadium shortly after they acquired the team, in January 2004. Right: Jamie McCourt in Dodger Stadium in 2008. By Robert Gauthier/Los Angeles Times (Frank McCourt), by Alex Gallardo/Los Angeles Times (Jamie McCourt), © D. Hurst/Alamy (baseball).

Vanessa Grigoriadis published “A Major League Divorce” in the August issue of  Vanity Fair (2011). Her reporting of events involving Jamie and Frank McCourt’s divorce is a prime example of why Major League baseball should do a far more thorough job of vetting potential buyers of, or investors in, Major League baseball franchises. It is […]