Cy Young in 1902. At the time, Boston's AL club was known as the Americans.

Best of Baseball… Coming Soon!

Cy Young in 1902. At the time, Boston's AL club was known as the Americans.

Following the baseball playoffs, FROM DEEP RIGHT FIELD will be running a series based on my book, ALL-TIME GREATS OF BASEBALL: My Top Picks At Each Position. The book is distributed by ULTIMATE BASEBALL THE GAME (UBTG). UBTG is an exciting strategy baseball board game that fans everywhere will no doubt love to play.

This new series is being published by request from baseball fans here in the USA and from across the globe.

How does Chipper Jones stack up against Pie Traynor?  How about Greg Maddux going against Cy Young?

These and many other questions will be covered in the series.

Here’s to what Walt Whitman called, “The American Game!”

 

  • Anonymous

    I bet money the average baseball fan has no idea who Pie Traynor is.

    • http://fromdeeprightfield.com/ Paul Gillespie

      Harold “Pie” Traynor is one the greatest third basemen of all-time.

  • Nankai23

    Sound logic here.
    T. Iida

  • Lefty

    It is sheer foolishness to assign home-field advantage, based on who wins the All-Star Game. This is not by any stretch of the imagination a sound baseball reason.

  • T. Tsujita

    This posting makes good sense.  And while we are at it, let’s also do away with the 3-of-5 series. This is too short to truly determine the better team. Since most teams have 4 or 5 front-line pitchers (some teams used 6 this season), it is only fair to have enough games that all 4 or 5 have a chance to start a game. That cannot happen, if a series goes only 3 games. Thus, a weak team with, say, two solid starters, might be able to win a short series. When the pitcher is different, everything changes. So only a 4-of-7 series can determine the truly superior team. Let’s consign the 3-of-5 series to the junk heap of failed ideas.
     

  • William Boyd

    A relative of mine has original sketch of Pie done by unknown newspaper artist. On back is a press stamp dated Oct 6, 1927. I found similar photo of sketch in Indiana Gazette newspaper, dated Oct 4, 1927. If you wish copy for any of your archives let me know. I posted copy on Net54 site with watermark, then I thought it to be a proof, but closer view shows raised brush strokes on sturdy stock. It is about 14 x 9 inches.

    • http://fromdeeprightfield.com/ Paul Gillespie

      What an exciting find–your knowing of the existence of the Traynor sketch. My guess is that it is valuable. I never saw Traynor play but the ones I know who did said watching him play was a special treat. Thanks again for your comments!

      • William Boyd

        Hi Paul,
        Thanks for you response. We are excited about the sketch. My cousin is not a sports collector, as this was from an inheritance along with over 100 Ruth press photos. He may be selling that piece, do you wish to be notified if he puts it up for auction?
        Did you have the opportunity to view the sketch, if not, I can send a copy, however, it will have a watermark across his photo as we are trying to protect the image if it is one of a kind.

        • William Boyd

          Hi Paul,
          After reading my first reply, I have to apologize, when I said “if you wish to view the sketch, I would send a copy with a watermark”, I meant, the first copy I would send would be with the water mark, as a sample. I know the work you are doing, and if you see the sample and wish to use it any way shape of form, I would send you a clean copy. I hope I did not insult you, I respect your work.
          William Boyd

  • JK Gillespie

    Pie Traynor? Easily among the rather small handful of those who could be considered the greatest third sacker ever.

    • http://fromdeeprightfield.com/ Paul Gillespie

      JK, I agree that Traynor is one of the best ever. C. W. Kinsey and Clarence Williams both said that Traynor and Ray Dandridge were the best they ever saw. They gave Dandridge a slight edge defensively–and Traynor the offensive edge–almost splitting hairs on the distinction. Whatever the case, they were both at the top of their profession!